A look at the advantages of the bolsheviks

Alexander Potresov later argued:

A look at the advantages of the bolsheviks

But shortly afterwards the capitalists regrouped and gathered support from the imperialist powers to wage a bloody war on the young communist regime that became known as the Russian Civil War.

Ninety years ago in was a key turning point when the Red Army turned the tide on the reactionary Whites. At the time of the October revolution, the Bolsheviks did not yet have a clear understanding of what type of army they would have to build.

This is not really surprising, the more concrete elements in the programme of a revolution cannot be deduced from a few simple principles, but will constantly be modified by experience.

A look at the advantages of the bolsheviks

Since the French revolution, the left in general had advocated replacing the standing armies with popular militias, to ensure they could not again be used against the people. It should be noted, though, that this was considered part of the minimum programme, and should not be confused with the concept of smashing the state.

During the revolution, Lenin did stress the need for proper organisation, training and military knowledge, but he basically stuck to this perspective. Induring the World War, he stated in no uncertain terms: After the seizure of power, the Bolsheviks were faced with a new vital and pressing task: That proved to be enough but it has to be recognised that this was largely due to the weakness of the counter-revolutionary forces at this point.

The combat worthiness of the old Russian Army was dwindling fast and, while the Petrograd garrison would not move against the Bolsheviks, most of it was not too keen on actively defending them either. The decree on peace, and even more the permission to the units at the front to open local peace talks with the Germans, ensured the army could not be used against the Soviet government, but it also contributed to its dissolution.

The Beginning of the Civil War [3] Even when something seems to have an obvious beginning, there are always causal events preceding and leading up to it. Several replies are possible to the question of when the Russian civil war started.

G. K. Chesterton and the Stereotype of “the Jewish Bolshevik” « Religious Histories and Discourses

After all, prolonged and open class struggle is, in Marxist terms, civil war. The year was filled by a rising tide of battles throughout the former Empire as well as direct military events like the Kornilov coup.

However, in examining the civil war as a conflict between armed forces, we can start from the seizure of power.

Rather, the Soviets had to seize power all over the former Empire. This gives the lie to the claim of the right that October was some sort of military coup. Incidentally, it also disproves the favourite notion of some supposed Trotskyists like Alan Woods Marxism and the State that the October Revolution was bloodless.

Of course, the uprising in Petrograd was, indeed, almost bloodless, but the process of consolidating the revolution across Russia as a whole lasted for months and varied greatly between cities and regions. In some places, like Moscow and Irkutsk, it took days of street fighting to win, with hundreds of casualties.

However, in most cities in Russia relatively little direct fighting was required for the soviets to overpower their opponents — indeed in several places, there was virtually no fighting at all.

The more industrialised a city was, that is, the more proletarian its population, the stronger was the revolution.

The Bolsheviks, the Red Army and the Russian Civil War | League for the Fifth International

Naturally, the Bolshevik government did all it could to spread the revolution. Red Guards were sent from Petrograd, Moscow and other cities; sailors were sent from the Baltic and, to a lesser extent, the Black Sea fleets. The Baltic sailors from Kronstadt and Helsinki not only played a key role in the October uprising but were an invaluable resource in the early stages of the civil war.Why were the Bolsheviks able to seize power in ?

A diverse group of factors sparked the fire of the Russian Revolution. Each of these problems gradually over time built up and caused what would be a major event in Russia's history.

In a previous report I looked at the stereotype of the so-called greedy Jew in G. K.

In a previous report I looked at the stereotype of the so-called greedy Jew in G. K. Chesterton’s fictional and journalistic discourse. In this report I will look at the stereotype of the “Jewish Bolshevik” in his discourse. In his essay on G. K. Chesterton’s so-called “philosemitism,” William Oddie argues that Chesterton could not have. A detailed account of the Bolsheviks that includes includes images, quotations and the main events in the growth of the movement. Key Stage 3. GCSE World History. Russia. A . The Bolshevik Revolution plunged Russia into a three-year civil war. The Red Army – backed by Lenin’s newly formed Russian Communist Party – fought the White Army, a loose coalition of monarchists, capitalists and supporters of democratic socialism.

Chesterton’s fictional and journalistic discourse. In this report I will look at the stereotype of the “Jewish Bolshevik” in his discourse. In his essay on G. K. Chesterton’s so-called “philosemitism,” William Oddie argues that Chesterton could not have.

Why did the Bolsheviks succeed? Probably the most important factor was Lenin himself. He was a driven man who believed that those who would lead the workers had to be an educated elite capable of doing things that an uneducated majority could not. First, in the Bolshevik’s victory, we can glimpse what maneuver warfare in the political dimension might look like.

Strategies of attrition are easily abstracted to non-physical or non-spatial strategic contexts. A detailed account of the Bolsheviks that includes includes images, quotations and the main events in the growth of the movement.

Key Stage 3. GCSE World History. Russia. A . Why the Bolsheviks won There were several reasons for the Red victory, which even the serious non-Marxist historian can often see, albeit not, perhaps, liberals in the mainstream media.

Reformists and liberals whine that democracy did not prevail, by which they mean parliamentary, bourgeois democracy.

Why were the Bolsheviks able to seize power in ? - GCSE History - Marked by ashio-midori.com