Keats essay questions

Suggested essay titles based upon John Keats' letters: You should refer to one of the longer poems or a selection of shorter ones.

Keats essay questions

Recommended Reading Sample Answer - John Keats The poetry of John Keats is filled with personal explorations of deep and intense feelings and reflections on life. His poems concern a variety of themes, such as eternity and the passage of time; poetic inspiration and ambition; and the desire to find permanence in the midst of constant change.

From reading his poetry I believe that these themes are clearly very important to Keats, as they can frequently be seen as the foundations on which much of his poetry is based. This concern is evident in WIH, when Keats describes his fears of death before he is able to fully express all that his mind holds: This shows to me a great poetic ambition within Keats, and a self-realisation of his potential as a writer of poetry.

This seems to show a recognition that his poetry, and the beauty that inspires it, is something magical and other-worldly, and this realisation adds to his distress, were he to die and never fully reach his poetic potential.

It seems Keats is suggesting that his own life could be full of these shadows, and that could be why, in stanza two, Keats describes how he resorts to alcohol as his means of escaping his sadness and misfortune: This line in particular seems to me perhaps to hold a double meaning.

Keats essay questions

First, that Keats will leave the world without being seen; alone and forgotten, second, that he himself will not look upon the world, and will instead let it go unseen by his senses, perhaps fading into a numbness that he describes at the start of the poem.

The word is like a bell to toll me back from thee to my sole self! But as the bird flies away, and the song fades, it seems that Keats is left wondering if he really has returned from his imagination, and is perhaps also left with the dilemma of whether he will continue to struggle on living in the real world, or retreat forever to the respite provided by his imagination.

Although I have never experienced the death of a close loved one, such as Keats has with the death of his brother Tom Keats, I do at times feel the pressures and ordeals in life can become too much to endure, and end up longing for a way by which to escape.

This theme is linked with that of perfection, and it seems that Keats believes that through the attainment of permanence and immortality, one could achieve perfection.

This theme could be seen once again in OTN, in which Keats describes how, though the nightingale will die one day, his song will live on through time, from generation to generation: Perhaps Keats believes that through his leaving behind his immortal poetry he can create a state of permanence in the midst of the constant passage of time.

In stanza two, Keats realises that, though he will live forever, the lover will never kiss his bride; he has almost kissed her, but will remain forever in that state, never granted the kiss.

Yet, he recognizes that her beauty will never fade and, though he will never kiss her, the lover may look upon her youthful beauty forever: The figures have been preserved in a moment of intensity that they can never enact, and so, it seems Keats both envies and pities them.

This image of a town left forever abandoned could represent the coldness and impersonality that is inseparable from the permanent, perfect beauty one attains through immortality.

It seems to me that Keats is presented with a dilemma of whether the cold beauty and empty perfection found in the urn is really something to be admired, or whether living a relatively brief, transient life full of real warmth and passion is preferable: In the last two lines, it seems to me as though Keats resigns himself to the fact that the eternal beauty of the urn, whether envious or not, is something no generation can ever obtain: I will be forced to take responsibility for myself as an adult, and face a range of new and demanding challenges, and as such, I have, at times, found myself desiring for life as a secondary school student to continue indefinitely, particularly the days of early secondary school when I was blissfully unaware of the difficulties of growing up and the pressure of exams and adulthood.Ode to a Nightingale and Two Look at Two In "Ode to a Nightingale" and "Two Look at Two", both poems tells of an experience in which the human characters encounters animals in the poems, the experiences are handled quite differently in the two poems.

Sample essay questions on the poetry of John Keats 1. ‘Keats delighted in the ways in which beauty, in both natural and human forms, revealed the truth about life.’. The poetry of John Keats is filled with personal explorations of deep and intense feelings and reflections on life.

John Keats Exam Questions - Keats' Kingdom

His poems concern a variety of themes, such as eternity and the passage of time; poetic inspiration and ambition; and the desire to find permanence in the midst of constant change. In this essay I will discuss the above themes, and how I responded to Keats’s treatment of them.

The poems on which I will base this essay are “When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be” [WIH], “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” [LBD], “Ode to a Nightingale” [OTN], “Ode on a Grecian Urn” [OGU], “To Autumn” [TA] and “Bright star. "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer" 1.

Sample Poetry Answer - Keats - Mr Reidy's Notes

Read a few pages of Chapman's Homer and try to ascertain why Keats found it so exciting. 2. Look up definitions of the Petrarchan and the Shakespearean sonnet.

John Keats Essay titles and questions - Keats' Kingdom.

John Keats Keats, John - Essay - ashio-midori.com